Government plans will reallocate nursery funding from poorer to richer children – and no one seems to notice

Government plans will reallocate nursery funding from poorer to richer children – and no one seems to notice

Government plans will reallocate nursery funding from poorer to richer children – and no one seems to notice

From the London School of Economics and Political Science:

Social mobility has been in the news in recent weeks. Announcing government plans to allow the expansion of selective secondary schools, Prime Minister Theresa May argued that “This is about being unapologetic for our belief in social mobility and making this country a true meritocracy, a country that works for everyone.” In response, academics, think tanks and even Conservative politicians have lined up to present the evidence that in practice, academic selection increases educational inequality, and strengthens the relationship between social background and attainment.

Meanwhile, however, the Department for Education (DfE) has been quietly consulting on their plans to change the system of funding for early education. In sharp contrast to the extensive coverage devoted to the grammar school debate, the proposed introduction of a national early years funding formula has received little attention. The proposal will mean radical changes to the funding nursery providers receive, and sharp funding cuts for many state nursery schools and classes. Given the role early education can play in leveling the playing field between different children as they start school, the damage to social mobility is likely to be at least as great as that caused by a small increase in the number of grammar schools.

Read more here.

Comments

comments